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Our little pup.  Sneaking to the couch for a rest on something #cozy.  #lifeslittlemoments #barefootdreams

Our little pup. Sneaking to the couch for a rest on something #cozy. #lifeslittlemoments #barefootdreams

#tbt a peek back to Fall 2010: cozy cashmere and layers of soft corduroy evoke the timeless autumn classicism of the English countryside #neigeclothing #kidsfashion #cozy

#tbt a peek back to Fall 2010: cozy cashmere and layers of soft corduroy evoke the timeless autumn classicism of the English countryside #neigeclothing #kidsfashion #cozy

Looking back: can’t believe this was taken 8 years ago. #tbt #neigeclothing #kidsfashion #fallfashion #timeless

Looking back: can’t believe this was taken 8 years ago. #tbt #neigeclothing #kidsfashion #fallfashion #timeless

The petal print in our Amber series of dresses and blouses takes its cue from traditional linocut printing, whereby the design is carved into a sheet of linoleum and the relief (reverse) is printed onto the fabric.

Originally used for wallpaper printing, the linocut technique can create a uniquely bold and primitive looking motif.  

This is also a great technique to introduce your little artists to the art of printmaking.  I love this project on the Art for Small Hands Blog.

photos courtesy of Neigeclothing and Apartment Therapy.  Lino block detail by Jesse Breytenbach.

A R T + K I D S : Sketchbooks When I was growing up my mom bought us good sketchbooks with one strict rule: never tear a page out of the sketchbook.
I am so grateful to have all those years of sketchbooks to look back on now. It’s fun to see the evolution of creativity from elementary school, high school and college years.
I have the same rule with my kids and their sketchbooks have become a go-to during down time, when they want some time to themselves. Their sketchbooks are their own personal journey. Nothing has to be perfect. Ever. Yet, it’s amazing to see the beautiful work that comes out of them. I believe in investing in good quality materials once they are ready to hold a pencil and you no longer have to worry about the hazards of pointed pens and pencils.
I love Canson’s 8 1/2” x 11” basic black bound sketchbooks. These have hard covers and have a high quality acid free paper that lasts over time, and takes all sorts of dry media nicely (pencil, colored pencils, markers). For materials, I love to have the following on hand: - colored pencils: I love Prismacolor - they are soft, provide vibrant color, and can blend.  These aren’t cheap so I keep them stashed away when not in use.  - water-based markers, such as Stabilo.  These may be water-based but they don’t wash out of clothes or furniture, so be mindful of location for these ones.   - for children 8 and up, I love Micron pens in various widths from .03 to .08.  These are great to use instead of pencils to teach them to commit to their line.  We don’t want little eraser fiends.  Happy accidents are a great thing in art, and working in pen frees them up and teaches them the confidence to just go with it.
-Adrienne

A R T + K I D S : Sketchbooks
When I was growing up my mom bought us good sketchbooks with one strict rule: never tear a page out of the sketchbook.

I am so grateful to have all those years of sketchbooks to look back on now. It’s fun to see the evolution of creativity from elementary school, high school and college years.

I have the same rule with my kids and their sketchbooks have become a go-to during down time, when they want some time to themselves. Their sketchbooks are their own personal journey. Nothing has to be perfect. Ever. Yet, it’s amazing to see the beautiful work that comes out of them. I believe in investing in good quality materials once they are ready to hold a pencil and you no longer have to worry about the hazards of pointed pens and pencils.

I love Canson’s 8 1/2” x 11” basic black bound sketchbooks. These have hard covers and have a high quality acid free paper that lasts over time, and takes all sorts of dry media nicely (pencil, colored pencils, markers). For materials, I love to have the following on hand:
- colored pencils: I love Prismacolor - they are soft, provide vibrant color, and can blend.  These aren’t cheap so I keep them stashed away when not in use. 
- water-based markers, such as Stabilo.  These may be water-based but they don’t wash out of clothes or furniture, so be mindful of location for these ones.  
- for children 8 and up, I love Micron pens in various widths from .03 to .08.  These are great to use instead of pencils to teach them to commit to their line.  We don’t want little eraser fiends.  Happy accidents are a great thing in art, and working in pen frees them up and teaches them the confidence to just go with it.

-Adrienne

A little humor…

A little humor…

(via witanddelight)

DAVID OLIVEIRA : “drawing” with wire

I love loose contour drawings.  I love studies and sketches with committed line, gesture, and movement.  David Oliveira uses the visual language of drawing (line, movement, gesture, contour) to create amazing wire sculptures.  

source: Saatchi.com., Huffington Post UK


Staffa, Fingal’s Cave (detail), Joseph Mallord William Turner, 1832

Staffa, Fingal’s Cave (detail), Joseph Mallord William Turner, 1832

(Source: sforzinda, via lapetitemandarine)

K I D S  +  A R T
Every child is born as a fearless creative.  As self awareness take over, this inner creative spirit can get quashed over time.  I am a creative by nature (and by trade), but am also a working mom, so nurturing this inner creative in my own children too often takes a back seat to all of the “urgent” minutiae in our daily life.  
I have been trying to cultivate times of stillness in our routine, and using some of these times for simple creation.  I went to the grocery store last night (which doubled as a few moments of rare alone time) and was surprised and thrilled to see the dining room table set up with paints, paper and brushes.  These 4 masterpieces awaited me when I arrived home.  
Each Friday I will try to bring tips that I use to cultivate times of stillness and creativity to nurture these little artists.
-Adrienne

K I D S  +  A R T

Every child is born as a fearless creative.  As self awareness take over, this inner creative spirit can get quashed over time.  I am a creative by nature (and by trade), but am also a working mom, so nurturing this inner creative in my own children too often takes a back seat to all of the “urgent” minutiae in our daily life.  

I have been trying to cultivate times of stillness in our routine, and using some of these times for simple creation.  I went to the grocery store last night (which doubled as a few moments of rare alone time) and was surprised and thrilled to see the dining room table set up with paints, paper and brushes.  These 4 masterpieces awaited me when I arrived home.  

Each Friday I will try to bring tips that I use to cultivate times of stillness and creativity to nurture these little artists.

-Adrienne

Love this quote from Tofurious.

Love this quote from Tofurious.


Ben Aronson, Coffee Break, 1997

Ben Aronson, Coffee Break, 1997

(Source: urgetocreate, via witanddelight)

I love polka dots for spring— especially for kids.  This was my inspiration sketch for the Neige Rachelle skirt.

I love polka dots for spring— especially for kids. This was my inspiration sketch for the Neige Rachelle skirt.

Thinking about summer and my favorite combo of cream and white.  Love these layers.

Thinking about summer and my favorite combo of cream and white.  Love these layers.

(Source: studdedrose, via fortheloveofpretty)

I love this season.

I love this season.

(Source: simply-divine-creation, via simply-divine-creation)

j-ackets:

co-ffeekids